Archive for the ‘Mental Health Issues’ Category

CDD members present in Frisco to Collaborative Divorce Professionals

Jody Johnson and Honey Sheff, both CDD members, presented on July 20th at a gathering of collaborative law professionals in Frisco.  The talk centered on effective strategies that collaborative professionals can employ when facing challenges with clients.  These problems can cover a broad spectrum–from clients who do not really want the divorce, those who want [...]

Forgiveness and Divorce Workshop for Collaborative Divorce Dallas Practice Group

Collaborative Divorce Dallas members took part in a compelling workshop this May, presented by Dr. Frederic Luskin, who holds his Ph.D. in Counseling and Health Psychology from Stanford University.  Dr. Luskin, Director of the “Stanford Forgiveness Project,” specializes in the facets of forgiveness and the role forgiveness plays in moving past trauma.  Dr. Luskin travels the [...]

What does Advocacy Look Like for the Attorney in the Collaborative Divorce Process?

With collaborative divorce, the role of “advocate” taken on by the attorney is altogether different than the litigation model. Find out what the advocacy role looks like for the family law attorney in the Collaborative Divorce Process.

TRANSITIONS: How Do We Feel Safe in Times of Change?

Divorce is a major life transition. Even when it is the best ultimate outcome for those involved, divorce is painful and scary. We can take a cue from the Mbuti tribe in Africa and create a safe “sphere” within which to reach again our equilibrium.

IMPROVE COMMUNICATIONS WITH COLLABORATION

By Linda Solomon, LPC, LMFT
Collaborative Divorce encourages open communication. It creates a chance to begin healing, by talking, with one another and the collaborative team.
Granted, it’s ironic, since communication is often a primary area of stress in any marriage. But that’s why the Neutral Mental Health professional is so critical and productive in the Collaborative [...]

Traditional Divorce & the issues for children

Psychological researchers stress the negative effects on children of contentious divorce. It’s no wonder that when parents engage in protracted litigation, the children can’t help but be emotionally disturbed by their parents’ fight.